9 Yellow Birds In Florida (ID Guide In 2024)

Last updated on March 4th, 2024 at 11:01 am

Florida has a diverse range of bird species, including various yellow birds. Some common yellow birds in Florida include American Goldfinch, Pine Warbler, American Yellow Warbler, New World Warbler, Yellow-throated Warbler, Prairie Warbler, and more.

Today, we will review 9 types of birds that are YELLOW in Florida.

1. Palm Warbler

Palm Warbler is singing
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Dendroica palmarum
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Palm Warblers are small, distinctive songbirds with unique markings. They have brownish-olive upperparts with streaks on their back and rusty caps on their heads, especially during the breeding season. They also have a bright yellow throat and chest with a distinct dark eye line and a pale eyebrow line. Their belly is whitish, and they are known for their characteristic tail-wagging behavior.
  • Size: 5 to 5.5 inches (12.5 to 14 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.3 to 0.4 ounces (9 to 11 grams).
  • Wingspan: 7.5 to 8.3 inches (19 to 21 cm).
  • Location: Palm Warblers breed mostly in Canada and migrate through eastern US states. Some spend winters in Florida and along the southeastern coast.

Do you know the Facts: Palm Warblers are common winter birds in Florida, seen from September to May. They appear in 40% of winter birdwatchers’ checklists. Unlike other warblers, they often forage on the ground, bobbing their tails as they search for insects.

RELATED ARTICLE: Types Of White Birds In Florida

2. Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow Birds In Florida
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Setophaga coronata
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Yellow-rumped Warblers are medium-sized songbirds with distinctive markings. They have grayish-blue upperparts with a yellow crown, a yellow patch on each side of their chest, and a prominent yellow rump. During the breeding season, males have additional streaks on their breasts. They also have a white throat and a black mask through their eyes.
  • Size: 5.1 to 5.5 inches (13 to 14 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.4 to 0.6 ounces (11 to 17 grams).
  • Wingspan: 7.5 to 9.1 inches (19 to 23 cm).
  • Location: Yellow-rumped Warblers breed mainly in Canada, the Rockies, and the Appalachian mountains. They migrate through the Midwest before wintering in the southern US, Pacific Coast, Mexico, and Central America.

Do you know the Facts: Yellow-rumped Warblers are winter residents in Florida, arriving in September and staying until May, with peak sightings from October to April. They’re found in 37% of winter checklists and often form large flocks during winter, sometimes displaying aggressive behavior towards other species.

3. White-eyed Vireo

Yellow Birds In Florida
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Vireo griseus
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: White-eyed Vireos are small, insect-eating songbirds with distinct markings. They have olive-green upperparts, a white belly, and a distinct white ring around their eyes, which gives them their name. They also have yellowish sides and flanks. Males and females have similar plumage.
  • Size: 4.5 to 5 inches (11 to 13 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.3 to 0.5 ounces (9 to 14 grams).
  • Wingspan: 7.5 to 8.7 inches (19 to 22 cm).
  • Location: White-eyed Vireos spend summers across the southeastern United States, often concealed in dense thickets. Coastal populations remain year-round, while they winter along the southeast coast of Mexico and the Caribbean.

Do you know the Facts: White-eyed Vireos are year-round residents in Florida, with higher sightings from March to October. They’re found in 13% of summer checklists and 8% of winter checklists. While both genders sing in winter, only males sing during spring and summer, often serenading from dawn until midday.

4. Common Yellowthroat

Yellow Birds In Florida
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Geothlypis trichas
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Common Yellowthroats are small, lively songbirds known for their distinctive markings. They have olive-green upperparts, a bright yellow throat, and a distinctive black mask that extends across their eyes. Males have a more extensive and vibrant black mask compared to females.
  • Size: 4.3 to 5.1 inches (11 to 13 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.3 to 0.4 ounces (8 to 11 grams).
  • Wingspan: 6.3 to 7.5 inches (16 to 19 cm).
  • Location: Common Yellowthroats breed across most of North America during the summer, excluding Alaska and northern Canada. Some individuals remain year-round along the Gulf Coast and Pacific Southwest, while others migrate south for the winter.

Do you know the Facts: Common Yellowthroats are year-round residents in Florida, found in 7% of summer checklists and 11% of winter checklists submitted by birdwatchers. The black mask of the male Common Yellowthroat serves as a signal during courtship, leading to aggression towards fake birds with masks. However, they do not attack when the bird lacks a mask.

READ ALSO: Small Birds with Long Legs

5. Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler is flying
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Prairie Warblers are small, brightly colored songbirds with distinct markings. They have bright yellow undersides and throats, with streaks that vary in intensity and color depending on the age and sex of the bird. They also have olive-green upperparts, a white belly, and a distinctive black streak that runs through their eyes.
  • Size: 4.3 to 5.1 inches (11 to 13 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.3 to 0.4 ounces (9 to 12 grams).
  • Wingspan: 6.7 to 7.5 inches (17 to 19 cm).
  • Location: Prairie Warblers breed in the eastern and southeastern US and winter in Florida, the Caribbean, and some coastal areas of Central America.

Do you know the Facts: Prairie Warblers breed in northern Florida during the summer and winter across the rest of the state. Their numbers peak during migrations from March to April and September to October. They’re recorded in 2% of summer checklists, 4% of winter checklists, and up to 18% during migration. Male Prairie Warblers sing two distinct songs: one to attract females and another to deter rival males.

6. American Redstart Female

Yellow Birds In Florida
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Setophaga ruticilla
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Female American Redstarts have more subdued plumage compared to males. They typically have grayish-olive upperparts and yellowish-orange patches on their sides and wings. Their undersides are whitish, and they lack the striking black and orange coloring seen in males. Their tail feathers may have some streaking.
  • Size: 4.3 to 4.7 inches (11 to 12 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.2 to 0.3 ounces (6 to 8 grams).
  • Wingspan: 6.3 to 7.1 inches (16 to 18 cm).
  • Location: American Redstarts breed in the eastern US states and Canada, extending into the northwestern US. During migration, they may also be spotted in central and western US states.

Do you know the Facts: American Redstarts are primarily seen in Florida during migration periods from April to May and August to October, with some individuals wintering in the southern part of the state. They’re noted in 1% of winter checklists and up to 27% during fall migrations. Interestingly, American Redstart parents selectively feed specific chicks rather than providing food to all offspring uniformly.

7. American Goldfinch

American Goldfinches are making love to each other
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Spinus tristis
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: American Goldfinches are small, brightly colored songbirds with distinct markings. During the breeding season, males have vibrant lemon-yellow plumage with a black forehead, wings, and tail. Females and non-breeding males have more muted yellow-green plumage. They have a slender, pointed bill and a distinct undulating flight pattern.
  • Size: 4.3 to 5.1 inches (11 to 13 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.4 to 0.7 ounces (12 to 20 grams).
  • Wingspan: 7.5 to 8.7 inches (19 to 22 cm).
  • Location: American Goldfinches are widespread across most of North America and typically remain year-round residents. However, individuals breeding in Canada and the Midwest migrate to southern US states for the winter.

Do you know the Facts: American Goldfinches are primarily seen during winter in Florida, from November to April, appearing in 8% of winter checklists. Cowbirds are unsuccessful in getting American Goldfinches to raise their young, as their vegetarian diet is unsuitable for cowbird chicks, leading to their demise within a few days.

RELATED ALSO: Types Of Black Birds In Florida

8. Eastern Meadowlark

Yellow Birds In Florida
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Sturnella magna
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Eastern Meadowlarks are medium-sized songbirds with distinctive markings. They have brownish upper parts with streaks, a bright yellow throat and chest with a distinctive black “V” shape on the chest, and a white belly. They have a relatively long bill and a rounded tail.
  • Size: 7.5 to 10.2 inches (19 to 26 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 3.0 to 6.0 ounces (85 to 170 grams).
  • Wingspan: 13.4 to 15.0 inches (34 to 38 cm).
  • Location: Eastern Meadowlarks are present year-round across eastern US states but breed in the Northeast and Canada before migrating south.

Do you know the Facts: Eastern Meadowlarks, a near-threatened species, are present year-round in Florida, appearing in 5% of summer checklists and 3% of winter checklists. Remarkably, they are capable of singing over 100 different songs.

9. Yellow-throated Vireo

Yellow Birds In Florida
Image Source by Flickr by Ahmad Hassan
  • Scientific Name: Vireo flavifrons
  • Birds Class: Aves
  • Identification: Yellow-throated Vireos are small, insect-eating songbirds with distinct markings. They have olive-green upperparts, a yellow throat and breast, and white undersides. They also have a distinctive white line over their eyes, a yellow “spectacles” pattern around their eyes, and a faint black line through their eyes.
  • Size: 5.5 to 6.3 inches (14 to 16 cm) in length.
  • Weight: 0.6 to 0.7 ounces (17 to 20 grams).
  • Wingspan: 8.3 to 9.1 inches (21 to 23 cm).
  • Location: Yellow-throated Vireos breed in eastern US states and winter in Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean.

Do you know the Facts: Yellow-throated Vireos breed in Florida, observed from March to October, appearing in 2% of summer checklists. Males of this species strategically place twigs in various locations and feign nest-building upon the arrival of females, hoping to attract them.

Conclusion

In conclusion, we’ve explored fascinating information about various bird species, including their scientific names, characteristics, behaviors, and habitats. From the vibrant American Goldfinch to the melodious Yellow-throated Vireo and the unique courtship antics of the Yellow-throated Vireo, the avian world is full of remarkable diversity and intriguing facts. Birds captivate our attention with their beauty, songs, and behaviors, making them a source of joy and wonder for birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts alike.

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